Sunday, August 14, 2016

ICYMI -- Small Press Comics Criticism and Whatnot for 8/8/16 to 8/14/16

Highlighting some great small press comics criticism being published, as well as other random things that have caught my eye over the past week.

COMICS CRITICISM

* John Seven reviews Sean Karemaker's THE GHOSTS WE KNOW from Conundrum Press, which he claims pushes the autobio comic to dense new places.

* Rob Kirby has a bunch of SHORT REVIEWS on a number of small press books that were sent to him for review in the first half of 2016.

* Alex Hoffman has a short review of Nick Drnaso's BEVERLY which he says "is about the horror of daily life". 

* Hoffman also reviews BREAKING IS OPENING by Sab Meynert, "a response to brokenheartedness." 

* Christopher M. Jones reviews Simon Hanselmann's MEGG AND MOGG IN AMSTERDAM, "that is part Adult Swim absurdity, part noise rock cacophony, all strange and cruel and hilarious psychedelic despair." 

* Kim Jooha's A DIALECTIC APPROACH TO COMICS FORM

WHATNOT

* Gil Roth interviews LESLIE STEIN about her books Time Clock and Bright Eyed at Midnight and the artistic benefits of boredom

* Annie Mok interviews MARE' ODOMO, focused on their book Late Bloomer.

* Meg Lemke interviews EMMA RIOS and BRANDON GRAHAM about their anthology, Island.

 * Cartoonist Sarah Glidden writes and draws this profile of the JILL STEIN CAMPAIGN for The Nib. 

* Chase Magnett does an incredible job answering the question, "IS IT TRULY POSSIBLE TO ETHICALLY CONSUME MARVEL AND DC COMICS?" Spoiler: The answer is "no". 

* Yumi Sakugawa's SELECT CHAPTERS AND EXCERPTS FROM MY IDEAL SELF-HELP BOOK WRITTEN SPECIFICALLY FOR SECOND-GENERATION ASIAN-AMERICAN WOMEN SUFFERING FROM LOW SELF-ESTEEM/DEPRESSION AND WHO ALSO WANT TO PURSUE A CAREER IN THE ARTS

* Leela Corman draws this "roundup" of JEWISH COMICS and tries to define what makes a comic a Jewish comic. 

* Gwen Benaway on Vivek Sharaya's first book of poetry, even this page is white, "an explicit exploration of racism from many sides. It looks at race-based gender violence, racism in Queer spaces, racism through economics, racism in friendships, and racism in sex and love.

* Frances Brent's NAN GOLDIN'S BALLAD OF SEXUAL DEPENDENCY, FROM CBGB TO MOMA

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